Semerwater Bainbridge Wensleydale.

The Yorkshire Dales national park, one of the most beautiful and awe inspiring places in all of Great Britain, NOT BEEN THERE ? it’s one of the must places to visit before the end, these images are from the 70/80s taken on monochromatic film a medium I was using at that time above all others, I have now bought a film scanner which although low resolution capture it does all I need, TO ARCHIVE MY OLD NEGATIVES AND POSITIVES B/W and COLOUR.

Semerwater the second largest natural lake in North Yorkshire,

Semerwater the second largest natural lake in North Yorkshire,

Semerwater
Semerwater is the second largest natural lake in North Yorkshire, after Malham Tarn. It is half a mile (800 m) long, covers 100 acres (0.40 km2) and lies in Raydale, by England’s shortest river the River Bain. A private pay and display parking area is at the foot of the lake.
Semerwater attracts canoes, windsurfers, yachtsmen and fishermen. There are three small settlements nearby:
Stalling Busk
Countersett
Marsett
Semerwater was the subject of a number of sketches and paintings by the artist J M W Turner.
Semerwater is a pleonastic “the use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning” place name. The name, first recorded in 1153, derives from the Old English elements sæ ‘lake’, mere ‘lake’ and water. The form “Lake Semerwater” introduces a fourth element with the same meaning.
The lake is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, first notified in 1975.
The Legend
According to an old legend, Semerwater was once occupied by a prosperous city. One night an old man (or in some versions, an angel in disguise) came down to the city, in search of food and drink. He went from door to door, and at each house he was turned away. Finally, he came to the hovel of a poor couple just outside the town; the couple took him in and treated him with great kindness.

When the stranger was about to leave, he turned to face the town and uttered the curse:

“Semerwater rise, and Semerwater sink, And swallow the town all save this house, Where they gave me food and drink.”

And as soon as this was said, the waters of the lake rose up and flooded the city, drowning the proud inhabitants and leaving only the hovel of the poor couple on the hillside unscathed.

The legend was the subject of a poem, The Ballad of Semerwater, by Sir William Watson.

Second largest natural lake in North Yorkshire, England after Malham Tarn.

Second largest natural lake in North Yorkshire, England after Malham Tarn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semerwater

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