WISDOM TEETH

A potential holiday nightmare

A week before our holiday and teeth problems not what I wanted, a back upper tooth “Wisdom” shed¬†a filling which left the whole thing with sharp edges prompting a visit to see the Dentist. It turns out the tooth in question is so broken and damaged it cannot be saved, therefor a need for extraction ūüėí after quite a tugging and pulling ordeal by the more than capable Dentist and his assistant the thing was out, and my mouth felt like a game of rugby union had been held in there. The procedure left me feeling pretty worn out and the staff at the dental practice thankfully contacted my wife who came to collect me, so a massive big thank you to all at the practice. ūüėāūüėāūüėā

A wisdom tooth or third molar is one of the three molars per Quadrant of the human dentition. Most adults have four wisdom teeth (a third molar in each of the four quadrants), but it is possible to have fewer or more.  Photo by Hic et nunc

A wisdom tooth or third molar is one of the three molars per Quadrant of the human dentition. Most adults have four wisdom teeth (a third molar in each of the four quadrants), but it is possible to have fewer or more.
Photo by   M(e)ister Eiskalt

A WEEK IN NORTHUMBERLAND.

HEXHAM, NORTHUMBERLAND.
Bank holiday Monday sees us on our way north to beautiful Northumberland, Staying at the “George Hotel” Chollerford on the North Tyne River, situated approximately four miles (seven km) to the north of Hexham.

Beaumont Street in the heart of Hexam.

Beaumont Street in the heart of Hexam.

Hexham’s architectural landscape is dominated by Hexham Abbey. The current church largely dates from c.1170‚Äď1250, in the Early English Gothic a style of architecture. The choir, north and south transepts and the cloisters, where canons studied and meditated, date from this period. The east end was rebuilt in 1860.
The Abbey stands at the west end of the market place, which is home to the Shambles a Grade II* covered market built in 1766 by Sir Walter Blackett

Hexham Abbey in Northumberland

Hexham Abbey in Northumberland
“Photo by Bob Castle”

At the East end of the market place stands the Moot Hall, a c15 gatehouse that was part of the defences of the town. The Moot Hall is a Grade I listed building, and was used as a courthouse until 1838. The Moot Hall now houses the Council offices of the Museums Department, though not open to the public any relevant enquiries can be made on the first floor. The ground floor is an art gallery open to hire.

The Old Gaol, behind the Moot Hall on Hallgates, was one of the first purpose built jails in England. It was built between 1330-3 and is a Grade I listed Scheduled Monument. It was ordered to be built by the Archbishop of York. The building is now home to the Old Gaol museum which informs the visitor about the how the prisoners were kept at this time and how they were punished. There is also information concerning the local families of time, such as the Charlton and Fenwick families who still have descendants living in the area. There are many different displays in the museum of interest to the whole family. The museum also contains the Border History Library, where people are free to visit to research their family history.

Hexham Library can be found in the Queen’s Hall. It contains the Brough Local Studies Collection which is the second largest local history collection in the county.

WENTWORTH-WOODHOUSE

My wife and I spent the afternoon at “Wentworth Woodhouse” Wednesday 15/04/15 we visited originally to see the more formal gardens, but particularly the ‚ÄúGarden Centre‚ÄĚ which we missed and drove by and arrived first the main house, renowned for it‚Äôs East facing¬† neoclassical Palladian style front facade, the time was 1-45pm and a tour was about to start (booking required) we asked if we could get on the tour despite not having booked, and to our delight they agreed at ¬£25-00 each. The tour took approximately 2¬Ĺ and covered the property‚Äôs history and that of it‚Äôs owners, to the present day owner Mr Clifford Newbold who apparently is a London architect by profession and in the process of restoring the property. The property is clearly worth seeing for it‚Äôs historic value, but it has to be on one of 3 variations of a guided tour basis http://www.wentworthwoodhouse.co.uk¬†otherwise you can only see the front elevation, the Original part of the property is in the Baroque Style and cannot be seen from the East front. I would struggle to recommend a tour particularly the ‚Äúfitzwilliam tour‚ÄĚ of the house and gardens. The house is void of original works of art, ceramics, grand furniture and a well stocked library, all the things associated with the aristocracy, particularly in a house owned by a two times British prime minister and having so much ministerial and social history.

Wentworth Woodhouse, stands in  250 acres of parkland and its East Front of 615 feet wide, its courts and buildings cover three acres or more of ground, and perhaps the largest  country palaces created in the18th century.

Wentworth Woodhouse, stands in 250 acres of parkland and its East Front above of 615 feet wide, its courts and buildings cover three acres or more of ground, and perhaps the largest country palaces created in the18th century.

Originally a Jacobean house,¬†entirely rebuilt by Thomas¬†Watson¬†Wentworth, ‚Äú1st Marquess of Rockingham‚Ä̬†(1693‚Äď1750). It was later reduced to the status of a wing by the immense scale of the new great addition created by his son the 2nd¬†Marquess¬†who was twice Prime Minister, and who established at Wentworth Woodhouse an important Whig powerhouse. In the 18th century it was inherited by the Earls Fitzwilliams¬†who owned it until 1979 (when it passed to the heirs of the 8th and 10th Earls), its value having appreciated greatly from the large quantities of coal discovered on the estate.

The earlier Baroque Style West front which cannot be seen from the east and vice versa a view from the private gardens.

The earlier Baroque Style West front which cannot be seen from the east and vice versa a view from the private gardens.

A view across the front elevation of the west wing frontage.

A view across the front elevation of the west wing frontage.

Wentworth Castle

Wentworth Castle is a grade I listed country house in the Romanesque Style, the former seat of the Earls of Stafford, at Stainborough, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, now home to "Northern College of Community  & Residential education".

Wentworth is a grade I listed country house in the Romanesque Style, the former seat of the Earls of Stafford, at Stainborough, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, now home to “Northern College of Community & Residential education”.

WENTWORTH CASTLE,¬†is a grade I listed country house in the¬†architectural Style of the¬†Romanesque, and the former seat of the Earls of Stafford, at¬†Stainborough,¬†Barnsley, South Yorkshire,¬†now home to¬†“Northern College of Community ¬†& Residential education”.¬†

An older house existed on the estate, then called Stainborough, when it was purchased by Baron Raby (later Earl of Strafford), in 1711, when It was still called Stainborough.

The original name survives in the form of¬†Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly¬†on the estate¬†which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001 and is open to the public year round 7 days a week. The castle’s gardens were restored in the early 21st century, and are also open to visitors.¬†

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

My wife and I spent a lovely afternoon walking round the gardens on a nice sunny day in April 2015, a little early in the year for the spring blooms but never the less very enjoyable. Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust took the decision in 2005 to support the fragile structure further with a scaffold in order to prevent its total collapse. The Trust succeeded in raising the £3.7 million needed to restore the conservatory in 2011 and work began in 2012, with grants from English Heritage, the Country Houses Foundation, the Heritage Lottery fund and the European Development Fund. The Trust completed the restoration of its fragile Victorian glasshouse in October 2013, and what a wonderful job they did too, The restoration of the Gardens and Parkland is an ongoing project providing many different and interesting things to see in the future and well worth the visit. 
The garden area of Wentworth Castle and the row of Lime trees

The garden area of Wentworth Castle and the row of Lime trees

A formal garden arrangement at Wentworth Castle

A formal garden arrangement at Wentworth Castle

A formal garden arrangement at Wentworth Castle

A formal garden arrangement at Wentworth Castle

 
A¬†folly ¬†is a¬†construction primarily for decoration, but either suggesting through its appearance some other purpose, or merely appearing to be so¬†extravagance¬†that transcends the normal range of garden ornaments or the class of building to which it belongs.¬†18th century¬†English & French gardens¬†often featured Roman temples, which symbolised classical virtues or ideals. Other 18th-century garden follies represented Chinese temples, Egyptian pyramids and¬†Obelisks and ruined abbeys, representing different continents or historical eras particularly that of¬†‚ÄúRomanticism‚ÄĚ and the¬†‚Äúpicturesque”.¬†Sometimes they represented rustic villages, mills and cottages, to symbolise rural virtues.¬†Many follies, particularly during famine, such as the Irish potato famine, were built as a form of¬†relief, to provide employment for peasants and unemployed artisans.
Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate which has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001

As a general term “folly” is usually applied to smaller buildings with no practical purpose. But the term is ultimately subjective and a precise definition is probably impossible. The images below are of general views of the grounds ,Gardens and Meadows of Wentworth Castle a place well worth a visit.

The Lake area within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The Lake area within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The walled area within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The walled area within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The Pastures within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The Pastures within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The Pastures within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The Pastures within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The "OBELISK" within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The “OBELISK” within the grounds and gardens of Wentworth Castle

The newly restored conservatory at "Wentworth Castle" Barnsley, south yorkshire.

The newly restored conservatory at “Wentworth Castle” Barnsley, south yorkshire.

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