POPPY WAVE

Poppy Wave
An installation art exhibition by Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer at Yorkshire Sculpture Park.
Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP Lower Lake, reaching over the historic Cascade Bridge.

LANDSCAPE Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer Presented by 14-18 NOW and Yorkshire Sculpture Park Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP’s Lower Lake, reaching over the Park’s historic Cascade Bridge. The breath-taking sculpture – along with Weeping Window, a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies seen pouring from a high window to the ground below – was initially conceived as one of the key dramatic sculptural elements in the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in the autumn of 2014. Over the course of their time at the Tower, the two sculptures were gradually surrounded by a vast field of ceramic poppies, each one planted by a volunteer in memory of the life of a British and Colonial soldier lost during the First World War. In their original setting they captured the public imagination and were visited by over five million people.

Poppies: Wave
05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer Presented by 14-18 NOW and Yorkshire Sculpture Park
Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP’s Lower Lake, reaching over the Park’s historic Cascade Bridge.
The breath-taking sculpture – along with Weeping Window, a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies seen pouring from a high window to the ground below – was initially conceived as one of the key dramatic sculptural elements in the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in the autumn of 2014. Over the course of their time
at the Tower, the two sculptures were gradually surrounded by a vast field of ceramic poppies, each one planted by a volunteer in memory of the life of a British and Colonial soldier lost during the First World War. In their original setting they captured the public imagination and were visited by over five million people.

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer.

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer.

My wife and I visited Yorkshire Sculpture Park specifically to see and photograph this magnificent event, an extension of the Tower of London poppy event, We also wanted to photograph the rest of the park as it changes it’s clothes into Autumnal attire.

THE SCULPTURE PARKLAND The park is situated in the grounds of Bretton Hall, an 18th-century estate which was a family home until the mid 20th century when it became Bretton Hall College. Follies, landscape features and architectural structures from the 18th century can be seen around the park including the deer park and deer shelter (recently converted by American sculptor James Turrell into an installation), an ice house, and a camellia house. Artists working at YSP, such as Andy Goldsworthy in 2007, take their inspiration from its architectural, historical or natural environment. Since the 1990s, Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) has made use of indoor exhibition spaces, initially a Bothy Gallery (in the curved Bothy Wall) and a temporary tent-like structure called the Pavilion Gallery. After an extensive refurbishment and expansion, YSP has added an underground gallery space in the Bothy garden, and exhibition spaces at Longside (the hillside facing the original park). Its programme consists of contemporary and modern sculpture (from Rodin and Bourdelle through to living artists). British sculpture is well represented in the past exhibition programme and semi-permanent installations. Many British sculptors famous in the 1950s and 1960s, but since forgotten, have been the subject of solo exhibitions at YSP.  The redundant Grade II* listed St Bartholomew's Chapel, West Bretton built by William Wentworth in 1744 has been restored as gallery space.

THE SCULPTURE PARKLAND
The park is situated in the grounds of Bretton Hall, an 18th-century estate which was a family home until the mid 20th century when it became Bretton Hall College. Follies, landscape features and architectural structures from the 18th century can be seen around the park including the deer park and deer shelter (recently converted by American sculptor James Turrell into an installation), an ice house, and a camellia house. Artists working at YSP, such as Andy Goldsworthy in 2007, take their inspiration from its architectural, historical or natural environment.
Since the 1990s, Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) has made use of indoor exhibition spaces, initially a Bothy Gallery (in the curved Bothy Wall) and a temporary tent-like structure called the Pavilion Gallery. After an extensive refurbishment and expansion, YSP has added an underground gallery space in the Bothy garden, and exhibition spaces at Longside (the hillside facing the original park). Its programme consists of contemporary and modern sculpture (from Rodin and Bourdelle through to living artists). British sculpture is well represented in the past exhibition programme and semi-permanent installations. Many British sculptors famous in the 1950s and 1960s, but since forgotten, have been the subject of solo exhibitions at YSP.
The redundant Grade II* listed St Bartholomew’s Chapel, West Bretton built by William Wentworth in 1744 has been restored as gallery space.

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