TENBY, South Wales

We just got home from a great holiday in Wales, unfortunately the weather could have been better but it wasn’t too bad to keep us in, and we managed a couple of trips in the area not least to Pembroke to see its’ Castle and birthplace of Henry VII . Here is an image of St Catherine’s Island in the South bay of Tenby captured from Castle Hill, Below which is the Castle at Pembroke.

St Catherine's Island, Tenby. Taken from Castle Hill.

St Catherine’s Island, Tenby. Taken from Castle Hill.

Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, South Wales

Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, South Wales

During the reign of Elizabeth I, the Earl of Pembroke (“Jasper”, the uncle of Henry VII) was the owner of St Catherine’s Island. Later, the ownership passed to the Corporation of Tenby, which took possession of a number of crown lands. It is recorded in 1856 that a few sheep inhabited the island. An observer described them as “half wild sure footed creatures that run, turn and look, run again and leap from crag to crag almost with the agility of the Alpine Chamois”.

For many centuries a tiny church was the only building on the Island. The remains of the church were demolished when the fort was constructed in 1867. Information on the finds discovered during the demolition can be found at Tenby Museum and Art Gallery. Since the construction of the fort the island has had several owners.

TRAFALGAR SQUARE

TRAFALGAR SQUARE is owned by the Queen in Right of the Crown and managed by Greater London, while Westminster City Council owns the roads around the square, including the pedestrianised area of the North Terrace. It forms part of the North bank of the Thames business improvement district. My wife and I visited on the 17 June 2015 the first time since the 70s, what a great experiance and much the same as I remembered it, with the exception of the lack of the famous pigeons. None or very few of these ubiquitous birds were to be seen anywhere around and this was something hard for us to understand, pigeons don’t just up sticks and leave they are part of life, it goes without saying they are just there.

What looks like an

What looks like an “Alien” levitating on Trafalgar Square

Whilst contemplating this bewildering fact and watching what appeared to be levitating aliens on the terrace in front of the National Gallery the crowds of people on the square seemed to have been made aware of something strange happening, and then we saw it, a Large FALCON and its’ handler, the very reason for the lack of pigeons, this company of falcon handlers were there flying their birds to keep the pigeons away naturally and without causing unnecessary suffering, again proving the general love of animals and nature by the British people.

A bird of prey used has a deterrent to control our ubiquitous pigeons.

A bird of prey used has a deterrent to control our ubiquitous pigeons.

EAST FROM HEXHAM

We decided to make our journey home from Hexham, Northumberland more interesting by taking a direction which would detour from the boring A1 (Great North Road) and take us via the east coast calling in at Redcar, Marsk, Saltburn and Whitby on the beautiful east coast of northern Britain extending our driving distance by only 10 or so miles but well worth it on what was a mix bag of weather all the way home, until Tadcaster area when the heavens opened and we had torrential rain the rest of the way home 40 miles or so.

SEASCAPE Redcar is a seaside resort and town with a large wind farm

SEASCAPE
Redcar is a seaside resort and town with a large wind farm

SEASCAPE Redcar seaside resort and promenade

SEASCAPE
Redcar seaside resort and promenade

REDCAR,

Redcar means either place by the red marsh from the Old English “read” meaning red and Old Scandinavian “kjarr” or “reedy marshland”, referring to the low lying site by the sea that Redcar occupies. Redcar originated as a fishing town in the 14th century, trading with the larger adjacent towns Until the mid-19th century when it was a sub-parish of the of Marske-by-the-Sea mentioned in the Domesday Book. In 1846 work was completed on the Middlesbrough and Redcar Railway, created to attract tourism and trade. After the construction of Redcar Racecourse in 1875, Redcar prospered as a seaside town drawing tourists attracted by its racecourse, and it’s eight miles of sands.

SEASCAPE Redcar looking South to Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Redcar looking South to Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE Marske-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Marske-by-the-Sea

MARSKE-BY-THE-SEA.

Marske-by-the-Sea, a village in the authority of Redcar and Cleveland in the county of North Yorkshire, England. It is located on the coast, between the seaside resorts of Redcar and Saltburn-by-the-Sea, and, although not a seaside resort itself, Marske is in the Civil Parish of Saltburn, Marske and New Marske comprising Longbeck and St Germains.

SEASCAPE Looking South from Marske-by-the-Sea to Saltburn-by-the-Sea

SEASCAPE
Looking South from Marske-by-the-Sea to Saltburn-by-the-Sea

SALTBURN-BY-THE-SEA.

Saltburn-by-the-Sea, built on and around the cliffs of the Cleveland Hills coast, it’s development and that of Middlesbrough was driven by the discovery of iron stone and potash in the Cleveland Hills, The area is not unlike Whitby which lies further down the coast, with it’s steep cliffs and roads, The Saltburn tramway, as it is known, was developed by Sir Richard Tangye’s company chief engineer. The cliff tramway opened a year later and provided transport between the pier and the town. The railway is water-balanced and since 1924 the water pump has been electrically operated. The first major maintenance was carried out in 1998, when the main winding wheel was replaced and a new braking system installed.

SEASCAPE Saltburn-by-the-Sea Cliff Tram to the town centre.

SEASCAPE
Saltburn-by-the-Sea Cliff Tram to the town centre.

SEASCAPE Saltburn-by-the-Sea beach with a sea fret building on the left of the image

SEASCAPE
Saltburn-by-the-Sea beach with a sea fret building on the left of the image

WHITBY.

Whitby built on each side of the river Esk, it’s pier follows the flow of the river heading directly north and giving exceptional light quality, ideal for artists and photographers. A place renown for it’s history of whaling, boat building and fishing for herring (Kippers when smoked) and of course the world famous explorer “Cpt James Cook”, the boats for local use were built with flat bottoms to enable landing on the beach so has to enable loading of “alum a natural element used in dying” and coal  on dry land via horse and cart. Whitby also boasts the visit from Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”  and it’s famous Abbey where the Synod of Whitby in 664 was held to establish the the Roman date for Easter. I cannot leave Whitby without a mention of the famous 19 century photographer Frank Meadow Sutcliffe who recorded the people of Whitby and surrounding area and their way of life in beautiful monochromatic photography.

SEASCAPE Whitby is a fishing town known for it's whaling activities and the third largest boat building community in the UK. The river Esk running out to sea.

SEASCAPE
Whitby is a fishing town known for it’s whaling activities and the third largest boat building community in the UK. The river Esk running out to sea.

SEASCAPE Whitby harbour from the west side of the River Esk town,

SEASCAPE
Whitby harbour from the west side of the River Esk town,

Captain Cook Monument Whitby

Captain Cook Monument Whitby

Views from the west bank of the River Esk Whitby.

Views from the west bank of the River Esk Whitby.

West bay Whitby 9-00pm

West bay Whitby 9-00pm

A WEEK IN NORTHUMBERLAND.

HEXHAM, NORTHUMBERLAND.
Bank holiday Monday sees us on our way north to beautiful Northumberland, Staying at the “George Hotel” Chollerford on the North Tyne River, situated approximately four miles (seven km) to the north of Hexham.

Beaumont Street in the heart of Hexam.

Beaumont Street in the heart of Hexam.

Hexham’s architectural landscape is dominated by Hexham Abbey. The current church largely dates from c.1170–1250, in the Early English Gothic a style of architecture. The choir, north and south transepts and the cloisters, where canons studied and meditated, date from this period. The east end was rebuilt in 1860.
The Abbey stands at the west end of the market place, which is home to the Shambles a Grade II* covered market built in 1766 by Sir Walter Blackett

Hexham Abbey in Northumberland

Hexham Abbey in Northumberland
“Photo by Bob Castle”

At the East end of the market place stands the Moot Hall, a c15 gatehouse that was part of the defences of the town. The Moot Hall is a Grade I listed building, and was used as a courthouse until 1838. The Moot Hall now houses the Council offices of the Museums Department, though not open to the public any relevant enquiries can be made on the first floor. The ground floor is an art gallery open to hire.

The Old Gaol, behind the Moot Hall on Hallgates, was one of the first purpose built jails in England. It was built between 1330-3 and is a Grade I listed Scheduled Monument. It was ordered to be built by the Archbishop of York. The building is now home to the Old Gaol museum which informs the visitor about the how the prisoners were kept at this time and how they were punished. There is also information concerning the local families of time, such as the Charlton and Fenwick families who still have descendants living in the area. There are many different displays in the museum of interest to the whole family. The museum also contains the Border History Library, where people are free to visit to research their family history.

Hexham Library can be found in the Queen’s Hall. It contains the Brough Local Studies Collection which is the second largest local history collection in the county.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Henry Moore's "seated Lady" in the central park area, March 2010

Henry Moore’s “seated Lady” in the central park area, March 2010

My wife and I make and have made over the years many visits to Yorkshire Sculpture Park and it never fails to impress, currently there is a very impressive exhibition of, what could be referred to as a biography of the whole body of art work created by Henry Moore a sculpture born at Castleford, just a few miles up the road comprising Sketches, paintings, Photographs, and his more famous MARBLE and BRONZE Sculpture in the underground gallery space in the Bothy garden with larger creations in the formal garden all of which is curated with the collaboration of his sister Mary Moore and well worth the visit.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with Bretton Hall in the distance.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with Bretton Hall in the distance.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the outdoor sculpture

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the outdoor sculpture

The Yorkshire Sculpture Park is an open-air gallery on the boarder of West and South Yorkshire, showing work by British and international artists, including Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth. The park’s collection of works by Moore is one of the largest open-air displays of his bronzes in Europe. The park occupies the parkland of Bretton Hall near the village of West Bretton “Wakefield”, and straddles the border of West and South Yorkshire

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house.

Y.S.Park, Central Lake area with the Peony house.

Y.S.Park, A sculpture from the Sophie Ryder Exhibition

Y.S.Park, A sculpture from the Sophie Ryder Exhibition

The Yorkshire Sculpture Park was the UK’s first sculpture park based on the temporary open air exhibitions organised in London parks from the 1940s to 1970s by the Arts Council. The ‘gallery without walls’ has a changing exhibition programme, rather than permanent display as seen in other UK sculpture parks such as Grizedale Forest. 

The park is situated in the grounds of Bretton Hall, an 18th-century estate which was a family home until the mid 20th century when it became a college. landscape features and architectural structures from the 18th century can be seen around the park including the deer park and the south side of the central lake and also including the upper lake area, only giving access to the public at large in recent years.

Since the 1990s, Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) has made use of indoor exhibition spaces, initially a Bothy Gallery (in the curved Bothy Wall) and a temporary tent-like structure called the Pavilion Gallery. After an extensive refurbishment and expansion, YSP has added an underground gallery space in the Bothy garden, and exhibition spaces at Longside (the hillside facing the original park). Its programme consists of contemporary and modern sculpture (from Rodin and Bourdelle through to living artists). British sculpture is well represented in the past exhibition programme and semi-permanent installations. Many British sculptors famous in the 1950s and 1960s, but since forgotten, have been the subject of solo exhibitions at YSP.

Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area

Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area

Y.S.Park, Upper Lake area

My wife sat in the Y.S.Park, Central Lake area.

My wife sat in the Y.S.Park, Central Lake area.

Adapted extracts from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorkshire_Sculpture_Park

Scratching wire

Sheep's Scratching wire, the one and only in the area.

Sheep’s Scratching wire, the one and only in the area.

Whilst out walking at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, upper lake area “a photographers delight” I came across this scratching wire, the only one in the whole area which I found strange. A little further on in our visit 10min or so, we encountered a number of Highland Cattle including a large Bull. A little daunting to say the least.

Highland cattle grazing the upper lake area of Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

Highland cattle grazing the upper lake area of Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

“ITALIA and it’s Seven Classical Cities”

My first Photographic/travel book   “ITALIA and it’s Seven Classical Cities”  contains 182 pages and 218 images in an 8 x 10″ landscape format, A photo travel log tour of the seven classical cities of Italy, Venice, Lucca/Pisa, Florence and Chianciano, Assisi, and Vatican City, Rome, and Siena, Florence and Rome two amazingly lively mirrors of the past. An amazing travel and photographic experience. not to be missed by artists or art lovers, a truly inspirational journey.  Those people interested in seeing it, it can be pre-viewed here at this link  :- http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/3240593

 PORTRAIT
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